Recruiting Smoke and Mirrors

Over the years I’ve seen recruiting take many strange twists and turns. This week was another example of why you can’t always believe what you see or hear.

When talking with parents and prospects I stress to keep the things they see on social media or reported by the recruiting media in check as not everything is a fact.

Wednesday was another fine example as Detraveon Brown, a wide receiver from Northwood High School (Shreveport, LA.) held a national signing day event where he reportedly signed with Ole Miss.

However, one problem soon came forward as Brown, a 3-star wide receiver, didn’t hold a scholarship offer from Rebels head coach Lane Kiffin that would allow him to sign a national letter of intent.

That didn’t stop Brown, his family or Northwood High School from holding a signing day event.

When Brown spoke with the media after his fake signing he broke down while giving thanks to those who supported his journey.

NCAA rules didn’t allow Ole Miss to comment on Brown being a signee or if he even held a scholarship offer.

Some reports have since come out that Ole Miss took another player over Brown and dropped the receiver in the final days of recruiting. Some now wonder how many of the 13 self-reported offers listed on Brown’s profile on 247Sports were real.

Brown made a mistake and those now going through the recruiting process should use it as a learning opportunity.

Recruiting is full of smoke and mirrors from recruits and college coaches who extend scholarship offers that are not binding.

I stress to players and parents not to be afraid to ask coaches if a scholarship offer is one a coach will take a commitment from.

When a young person is told they have an offer they often don’t want to think the offer is not one they can accept.

However, it happens all the time and will not end until the NCAA changes the process.

As for Brown, all is not lost as he did sign with North Texas with the school officially announcing his signing on Twitter Thursday morning.

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